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NASA is sending detergent to space! Let's explore this news.

 NASA is sending detergent to space, for astronauts. the space agency is working hard to solve what is one of the most thorny tasks in space for astronauts.

Ever wonder how the astronauts aboard the International Space Station do their laundry?

Logo of NASA and TIDE detergent
The logo of NASA and TIDE detergent to be tested into the space.

Is it true that NASA is sending detergent into the space?

According to Daily Mail's report, Tide has signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA allowing it to send a pair of detergent and stain removal experiments to the space station later by the end of this year and next year.

Why NASA is sending detergent into the space?

Dirty clothes get trashed in space. To stop this, NASA and Tide are working on a detergent. ... so it has teamed up with the Procter & Gamble Company to figure out how to clean astronauts' clothes in space so they can be reused for months or years, just like on Earth.

Well, they don't, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working hard to solve one of the most thorny tasks in space — doing laundry.

The US consumer goods giant said Tuesday that the space agency plans to conduct several experiments to find a long-term solution to the problem using Procter & Gamble's specially designed detergent.

The critical nature of water on space missions meant that astronauts simply took off used clothing, happy with the knowledge that they would decompose upon re-entering the atmosphere.

As a result, NASA sends 160 pounds of clothing to the International Space Station per year per crew member.

For the long haul, the US agency and Elon Musk's Space X have their eye on manned missions to Mars, requiring more permanent solutions.

Labeled NASA Tide after P&G's main washing powder, the first tests on the new detergent to evaluate the effects of microgravity and radiation will take place on a cargo flight to the ISS next year and, later, in the space station itself.

P&G will also send some additional equipment for treatment and image analysis, even though the ISS has most of the equipment needed for the experiments.

P&G said similar experiments would be conducted on Earth at the same time using similar materials to study the differences.

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